Standards

Essential Questions

  1. How is information passed from one generation to the next so that offspring resemble their parents but are not exactly the same as their parents?

Essential Learnings

  1. Describes and demonstrates that DNA codes for proteins and is the molecular basis for the transfer of biological characteristics from one generation to the next.
    • A. Describes the basic structure of DNA and the relationship among DNA, chromosomes and genes.
    • B. Describes the function of DNA in heredity.
    • C. Describes the basic flow of information from DNA to protein through RNA.
    • D. Compares and contrasts the processes of mitosis, meiosis and binary fission.
    • E. Explains the significance of DNA replication.
    • F. Explains the significance of mutation and its relationship to genetic diversity and the evolution of populations.
    • G. Explains how an organism’s genetic makeup may not be fixed at birth.
    • H. Explains why some conditions (such as Tay‐Sachs) are purely genetic, while some (such as diabetes) are the result of the interaction of genes and the environment.
    • I. Using Mendel’s Laws and monohybrid Punnett squares, calculates the probability that an individual will inherit particular traits.
    • J. Understands how the introduction of biotechnology has affected or could affect humans and other organisms, and understand how human attitudes and values have impacted the development and introduction of new biotechnology.

Standards

  1. Students know and understand the characteristics and structure of living things, the processes of life, and how living things interact with each other and their environment. 
    • DNA is the molecular basis for the transfer of biological characteristics from one generation to the next. DNA is transcribed into RNA, which is translated into proteins.

Unit 5-Genetics Links